Welcome! This site is written for Social Security disability claimants, for their legal representatives, and for the network of people involved in the Social Security disability claim process. I hope you find it helpful.
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Social Security relies primarily on medical evidence to evaluate disability claims. However, they also look at nonmedical evidence, including the forms that claimants complete during the disability evaluation process. See 20 CFR 404.1513(a)(4).

Nonmedical evidence can also include a statement from parent, spouse, other family member, or a friend. That statement is typically 1

NOSSCR developed a “Hearing Format Election Statement,” which is an excellent one-page, fillable form that contains all four types of hearing modalities (in-person, VTC from the hearing office, telephone, and online video) and allows for a simple way to notify the hearing office of how the claimant wants to appear at their hearing.

Using NOSSCR’s

I have started writing short, one-page letters to the disability examiners at the initial or reconsideration level, setting forth my theory of the case. The letter briefly describes the claimants limitations, and then makes the vocational analysis based upon the claimant’s work history. For many years I have written detailed briefs for judges at the

NOSSCR has developed what it calls a “Hearing Format Election Statement,” which is an excellent one-page, fillable form that contains all four types of hearing modalities (in-person, VTC, telephone, and online video) and allows for a simple way to notify the hearing office of how the claimant wants to appear at their hearing.

Using NOSSCR’s

When a concurrent Title II and Title XVI case is awarded, the claim goes to the local Field Office for a determination of SSI benefits. This process takes some time, because the claim specialist at the field office needs to make an appointment to call the claimant to document the claimant’s income and assets to determine financial eligibility (SSI is a need-based program). Then the claim gets sent to the Payment Center, where Title II benefits are calculated, and then the SSI benefits offset the Title II benefits. Therefore, concurrent cases typically take several weeks longer to get paid than straight Title II-only disability claims. This is frustrating, because the SSI claimants are the ones who often need to money the most.

The monthly Title II disability benefit (PIA) is usually greater than the monthly Title XVI SSI amount. And while the SSI benefits begin to accrue on the filing date of the claim, the disability benefit is not paid until after the 5-month waiting period after the onset date. To evaluate these payment issues, you need to compare the filing date with the onset date, and know that the eligibility date for Title II is 5 full calendar months after the onset date.Continue Reading Title II Offset When a Representative Fee is Involved

I’m not the person I used to be.

Social Security disability applicants often tell me this when I meet with them to discuss their claims. At the hearing, I will ask them to explain to the judge why they are a different person today than when they were able to work. It is usually compelling

Almost all the hospital groups now have patient portals, which give patients online access to their medical records, test results, upcoming appointments, and more.

When developing a disability claim, I find that I am asking clients more and more frequently to provide me with the user name and password for their patient portal account.