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Social Security Adult Listing 12.05C rewards the lawyer who digs a little deeper into a claim. The listing requires:

A valid verbal, performance, or full scale IQ of 60 through 70 and a physical or other mental impairment imposing an additional and significant work-related limitation of function

The beauty of this listing, from my point of

Every year I handle at least one claim involving adult listing 12.05C. That listing requires:

A valid verbal, performance, or full scale IQ of 60 through 70 and a physical or other mental impairment imposing an additional and significant work-related limitation of function;

The listing is a two-pronged test. The first prong is a

I have had a spate of cases lately with disability claims involving Listing 1.04A.

Listing 1.04 is entitled "Disorders of the Spine." This listing is for people who have serious back or neck problems (often due to a herniated disc) and are in a great deal of pain. The listing is in play when there is an MRI or other radiological evidence showing compression of the spinal cord nerve root or the spinal cord itself.

Listing 1.04A has several other criteria as well, including neuro-anatomic distribution of pain (in most cases, pain radiating from the lower back to the legs), limitation of motion of the spine, muscle weakness and a postive straight-leg raising test for cases involving the lower back.

These claims are often problematic during the early disability claim process – even when claimant has an MRI showing the nerve root compression, which is the hardest element of the listing to meet. The problem is that the other listing criteria, although present, are rarely noted in the claimant’s medical records. As a result, the listing is almost never met initially. So what to do?


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Step 3 of Social Security's 5-step sequential evaluation process is a determination whether or not a disability claimant "meets or equals a listing." The Social Security Administration has regulations describing more than 150 categories of medical conditions. These are called "listed impairments," or “listings.” The listed impairments are medical conditions that are severe